THE EFFECTS OF VERBAL OPERANT TRAINING AND RESPONSE INTERRUPTION AND REDIRECTION ON APPROPRIATE AND INAPPROPRIATE

1 Type II CEU

Past research has shown that response interruption and redirection (RIRD) can effectively
decrease automatically reinforced motor behavior (Hagopian & Adelinis, 2001). Ahearn, Clark,
MacDonald, and Chung (2007) found that a procedural adaptation of RIRD reduced vocal
stereotypy and increased appropriate vocalizations for some children, although appropriate
vocalizations were not targeted directly. The purpose of the current study was to examine the
effects of directly targeting appropriate language (i.e., verbal operant training) on vocal
stereotypy and appropriate speech in 3 children with an autism spectrum disorder. The effects of
verbal operant (i.e., tact) training were evaluated in a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design
across participants. In addition, RIRD was implemented with 2 of the 3 participants to further
decrease levels of vocal stereotypy. Verbal operant training alone produced slightly lower levels of
stereotypy and increased appropriate vocalizations for all 3 participants; however, RIRD was
required to produce acceptably low levels of stereotypy for 2 of the 3 participants.

Praise for this course:

by Germaine Seufert

by Germaine Seufert
Anne Denning
Anne Denning
BCBA Instructor, ACE Provider

About the instructor

Anne Catherine Denning is a BCBA and an ACE (Approved Continuing Education) Provider with Consultants for Children, Inc. approved by the BACB.

Anne has a passion for improving the quality of providers in the Autism Intervention category and is a Behavior Analyst. She leads cases and supervises RBTs, BCaBAs and BCBAs and keeps her content material relevant and based on recent research.

What's included?

1 Quiz
1 Survey
1 PDF
1.0

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